Monday, 25 June 2018

A Deadly Hunter

This subject was brought to my mind after watching the latest BBC Springwatch programmes. In more than one programme - they run for several days consecutively - a weasel was shown taking young birds from nests, close to the ground it has to be said. Two nests near to each other were predated including one of Yellowhammers, sadly becoming quite a scarce bird. Of course this is nature and the weasel probably had young to feed - they are carnivores after all. I found an interesting photograph- two actually that I combined - and this is the result.



A Deadly Hunter - 16" x 12" Waterford High White 140lb (300gsm) not.

My aim with this painting, and indeed generally, is to have small areas of detail and large areas of generality. This is what Charles Reid teaches. Not as easy as it sounds and the tendency is, especially when painting from photographs, which is what I do, to become tighter. I think I've probably (mostly) achieved this with more recent paintings other than Portraits.

Colours were a variety of greens - Sap Green from Lukas, Green-Gold from Rowney plus Oxide of Chromium, with Transparent Brown (Schmincke), Raw Sienna, Quinacridone Gold (Daniel Smith) plus some Cerulean and Ultramarine Blue. Ultramarine Violet also features and Cobalt Violet. For the latter I used Lukas but this paint is greyish and very weak. There are other Cobalt Violets that I think are better, some more reddish such as Winsor & Newton.


I'm happy with the above as I achieved what I set out to do.



8 comments:

SilverMom said...

Like!! Not only technically well-done, but also full of the personality of this little hunter.

Peter Ward said...

Thanks!

abdulMuiz Chulan said...

mr Peter...i have been following your blog reguarly for the past couple of years....

I have a request. Would you do a simple article on how edward seago n ted wesson did skies....their choice of colors...techniques and brushes...

thank you sir.

abdul muiz,
malaysia. (±6)0183551456

abdulMuiz Chulan said...

too bad the weasel is going to be hunt for sable brushes

Peter Ward said...

Hi Abdul. I don't know about Seago. He was mostly an oil painter although he did a lot of watercolours. I would suggest he used a very limited palette , although the Hong Kong paintings he did are very colourful.

As for Wesson he used 200lb Bockingford paper, His brushes were described as 'French polishers mops' which I gather were the Isabey range of mop brushes. HIs palette was three blues (WInsor , Ultramarine and Cobalt).Burnt Umber, RawSienna, Winsor Yellow or Cadmium yellow, Light Red Burnt Sienna. These were all from Winsor & Newton. Hope this helps.

abdulMuiz Chulan said...

thank you sir....err one more question... whats the different between light red and burnt sienna?

I appreciate your sharing!

Peter Ward said...

Light Red is very opaque and duller than Burnt Sienna.

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