Tuesday, 21 October 2014

Latest Amerindian

This is my latest attempt at an Amerindian circa 1900. I don't know his name or the tribe. 


Unknown - 16" x 12" Centenaire 140lb (300gsm) not

I made an initial pencil drawing using one of my most recent acquisitions a Pentel 07 Graphgear 1000 Draughting pencil. I'm not sure that this is any better than the cheaper Pentels I normally use, possibly more durable. Recent portraits have been done without the time consuming measuring and careful working out or spacing of features. I don't want to become too mechanical in my approach and not be fixated on copying the photo exactly. I don't think the above is too bad in that respect but the facing eye looks a little threatening and perhaps should have been toned down a little. I think the result is fair if not quite up to the standard of my better ones. I'm also trying to stick to Charles Reid's mantra of `small areas of detail, large areas of generality and have been (again) looking at my reports of the Stow workshop and his approach to the portrait he painted.

Colours used for the features and skin were Cadmium Red Light, Raw Sienna and Cerulean. To darken the eye shadows Ultramarine Blue was added. The hair is a mixture of Ultramarine, Burnt Umber and Raw Umber. The colours of the shirt include Quinacridone Gold (Daniel Smith PO49), Raw Sienna, Cobalt Violet etc.

Brushes used were mainly the Isabey retractable size 6 and Rosemary Kolinsky retractable sable size 6 plus Escoda retractable Kolinsky sables sizes 8 and 10. The reason for the retractables is that this was done at my art group Thursday session.



6 comments:

ann @ studiohyde said...

I think this is very good Peter, plus I like the loose approach with the watercolours.

Peter Ward said...

Thanks Ann.

Oscar Solis said...

I really like this one. It's got such a casualness.

"Recent portraits have been done without the time consuming measuring and careful working out or spacing of features. I don't want to become too mechanical in my approach and not be fixated on copying the photo exactly."

The above reminds me of something that Patrick Woodroffe once wrote about something not being what it should be but what it could be.

I like the new approach.

Peter Ward said...

Thanks Oscar, always interested in your opinions and comments.

L.W.Roth, said...

I like the primitive effect Peter of free hand minus stopping to lone up measurements. Iit's appropriate to your subject--or not? The Amerindians might not think so?

Peter Ward said...

Hi Linda. I don;t think there iss anything offensive about it. I wouldn't have done it otherwise - just an experiment that could be applied to portraits of other non -indian subjects.