Monday, 27 January 2014

New Palette

As I've already indicated the `Blue Jays' study (see separate piece) stemmed from the AVA weekly subject  `Winter Scene'. I'm hooked on birds so combined the two. It also coincided with my revised palette of 24 paints utilising the new insert I asked Craig Young to make. 


Top Row: Hansa Yellow Medium (Daniel Smith PY97), Indian Yellow (Rowney PY153), Perylene Maroon (Graham PY179), Quinacridone Rose (Graham PR19).

Second Row: Permanent Carmine (W & N PR N/A), Quinacridone Coral (Daniel Smith PR209), Ultramarine Blue (Rowney PB29), Cerulean Blue (Graham PB35).

Third Row: Cobalt Blue Deep (Rowney PB72), Cyan Blue (Maimeri PB15:3), Cobalt Teal Blue (Daniel Smith PG50), Turquoise (Lukas PB16).

Fourth Row: Ultramarine Violet (Rowney or Graham PV15), Raw Sienna, (Winsor & Newton ), Raw Umber (Rowney PBr7), Translucent Brown (Schminke Pbr41).

Fifth Row: Burnt Umber (Rowney Pbr7), Quinacridone Gold (Daniel Smith PO49), Qinacridone Rust (Graham PO48), Translucent Orange (Schminke PO71).

Sixth Row: Viridian (Rowney PG17), Phalo Green Yellow Shade (Maimeri PG36), Moonglow (Daniel Smith), Gold Ochre (Winsor & Newton PY43)

There is nothing scientific about the above selection. Limited palette enthusiasts will hold their hands up in horror and wonder about some of the selections.  It is a combination of `must have' colours and those I just
 happen to like. As far as makes are concerned I choose  many of the colours on price as long as the quality is acceptable. Some of the above may well be replaced by other makes. Other colours are chosen because I just happen to love them, Cobalt Teal Blue, Translucent Orange, Translucent Brown and Moonglow are examples.  I'm trying Translucent Brown as a replacement for Burnt Sienna. The Daniel Smith choices are because they do such great colours although very pricey. Although I've listed Cerulean Blue under Graham I actually prefer the Windsor & Newton version. I think there are several alternatives to some of the above. I intend to make up a secondary palette of twelve colours including Green-Gold, Sap Green, Green Apatite, Quinacridone Fuschia, maybe Indigo and Permanent Magenta. Madness? No just me indulging myself. Different colours for different subjects. 

13 comments:

Mick Carney said...

My mind is 'boggled'. All too much for a simple soul like me. You do make use of a wide range of colour in your pictures and it certainly works for you, vibrant colour being a characteristic of your art. Another informative post. Thank you.

hap said...

I had an artist friend chastise me for having so many colors in my palettes, telling me I should limit myself to a primary palette and mix any and all other colors. She was unable to give a satisfactory answer when I simply asked "why?". Like you I have an integral set of colors that I can't do without (which oddly enough seems to BE a split primary) and lots of other colors that I ENJOY using and finding ways to use! At this point we all need to ask ourselves "WHY NOT?" Why take any of the joy OUT of painting? We need to add MORE joy TO our paintings! As of late, it has been more and more difficult to find time to paint...so when I have the time, I want to ENJOY it! Now for those who enjoy a simple, limited palette and are happy with it...Hooray! And for the rest of us, if you like it and use it, ENJOY IT!! I don't care if I have three palettes open in front of me as long as I can find the color I want on my brush !!

Peter Ward said...

Thanks Mick. If some of the greats of the past had access to the range of paints now available would they have stuck to the very limited palettes they used.

In most of my paintings I doubt if the main colours exceed 7 or 8. Each to his or her own I say. :)

Peter Ward said...

Hi Hap. The greats of the past had a very limited availability of colours so had to mix - would they do so if they had today's range?

Ruth Steinfatt said...

Living in Canada I am very familiar with Blue Jays and your rendition is great!

Peter Ward said...

Thanks Ruth I didn't know where the bird lived.

Jane Blundell said...

Thanks for sharing Peter. I think one of the joys of watercolour is that we are playing with the actual pigment, not just the colour. Different pigments behave differently. We may be able to mix a certain hue, but it's the pigment that gives the granulation or opacity or whatever. Besides, working with a very limited palette means you need lots of mixing space and time. Who always has that? I'm with you and 24 colours, some of which are convenience mixes, just not all used in one painting :-)

Peter Ward said...

Thanks Jane. Why not an extended palette? I think a lot is based on the fact some of the famous watercolour artists of the past had to make do with a limited palette because the range of paints available were much smaller. Would they have done so if they had access to the current ranges? Maybe but I have my doubts.

dave said...

Peter...I just purchased used Craig young pallete on ebay...owned by Charles reid...would like to post pics...but don't know how

Peter Ward said...

Hi Dave

Are you sure this is genuine? I can't believe Charles Reid would sell his palettes on e-bay.

dave said...

Yes.I follow his Facebook page run by his daughter ,she posts daily and runs it for her father, posts a new painting every day....she posted a link to the eBay sale...I would post pics if I could figure it out

dave said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
dave said...

Efferen from iba Co palleys is making me a robbie as well...