Sunday, 10 June 2012

Fealing Lin

During the last two years I have become aware of many new watercolour artists,  some via WetCanvas and many more recently from Facebook. Keest Van Aalst's book `Realistic Abstracts' started me off exploring many new (to me) artists. Amongst several of those who have made a big impression is Fealing Lin. Actually I now recall it was an issue of `Watercolor Artist' where I first saw one of her paintings. I had intended to do a feature for some time and providentially the latest issue of `Watercolor Artist' June 2012 has an article about her,  specifically on portraiture. Portraits are only part of her repetoire though as some of the following paintings will show.







Originally from Taiwan, where she studied painting under Professor Ching-Jung Chen, before then moving to the United States where she now lives. She is a renowned artist who has won many awards and is a much sought after workshop teacher.



Fortunately the magazine article gives us an insight into her methods and materials. Her favourite paper is Fabriano - presumably Artistico - 300 lb hot pressed, but she also uses Canson for smaller figure paintings. Her favourite sizes are either 16" x 12" blocks or 21" x 15" Sheets.



With regard to paints her favoured brands are Holbein and Daniel Smith. She uses only transparent colours, no black or white. Her portrait and figure painting palette consists of Cadmium Yellow, Cadmium Orange, Cadmium Red Light, Alazarin Crimson, Raw Sienna, Burnt Sienna, Burnt Umber, Quinacridone Gold, Hookers Green, Mineral Violet, Cerulean Blue, Turquoise Blue and Ultramarine. Despite saying she uses only `transparent ' colours note some of these are opaque, especially the Cadmiums.



Brushes, which she says she's not `picky' about are mostly rounds in sizes 10 to 16 plus some squirrel mops. This presumably is specific to her portrait work, because a report on one of her workshops on landscape painting quotes various sizes of flats.

Drawing is accomplished with a 3B pencil and she occasionally uses liquid frisket - masking tape to us Brits - to preserve small lights.



Her tecnique involves using large brushes and working upright at an easel. She is definately one for `drippy' washes allowing colour to freely mingle on the paper. She does use several layers of paint but keeps brushstrokes to a minimum to avoid overworking. She lets each layer dry before proceeding further. According to the article her paintings can take `a couple of hours', `a couple of days', a few weeks or even several months depending on what she is working on and as she says `luck'!  She does work from live models but mostly photos and intially draws carefully. She uses contrasting or complementary colours to draw the viewers eye. Like Charles Reid she emphasizes painting shapes rather than things. Her final advice is to study design, make good shapes and always return to the basics. This specifically refers to her portrait painting and she differs in other subjects. A tough one to emulate.







I have also e-mailed her with some questions about her landscape work and will publish her reply when I receive it.

Note added 12/06/12: I received a prompt reply from Fealing LIn to the following questions.

1.What is your landscape palette?

2. What brushes do you use for landscapes?

3. What paper do you use?

"My basic palette of watercolours: Ultramarine Blue, Cerulean Blue, Cobalt Blue, Turquoise Blue, Prussian Blue, Green Gold, New Gamboge, Quinacridone Gold, Raw Sienna, Burnt Sienna, Permanent Alazarin Crimson, Quinacridone Magenta, Quinacridone Burnt Orange, Opera."

"I use brushes as large as possible both round and flat. My favourites are 2", 11/2", "1", 1/2" flat and No12 round. Riggers , old oil brushes, tooth brushes and palette knives are very useful for me".

"D'Arches (presumably this means Arches) 140lb cold press in sheets or blocks are the ones I always have in my paper drawer but I use all kinds of brands on my sketch books" 










26 comments:

Anns Art said...

What an amazing artist. Thanks for sharing as I had never heard of her.

Jean Spitzer said...

I have long admired her watercolors. Thanks for sharing these.

Ray Maclachlan said...

What a colourist Peter. Enjoyed the work very much. Did you happen to get her landscape palette/

Judy said...

Thanks for sharing, Peter! I did not know her, she is amazing!

Peter Ward said...

Thank you Ann, Jean and Judy. Glad you liked the post.

Ray I have added some links at the bottom of the post and have e-mailed her about her landscapes. Hopefully I'll get a reply and if so will publish it.

Carmen said...

I'm going to say it again. I'm so glad I found your blog. Another gorgeous artist I did not know about. I just love her style. I'm reading that abstract book at the moment and really enjoying it (plus my Atmospheric Watercolours arrived the other day too. Love it!) I'll definitely follow these links up.

Peter Ward said...

Thanks Carmen, she does produce beautiful work although the near abstract nature of some paintings won't appeal to everyone.

Beate said...

peter, I LOVE your blog....spent the whole weekend with your paintings and articles and am absolutely fascinated...thanks for sharing!!! For me a double win...you improve my English...:-)

Peter Ward said...

Thanks Beate. Glad you find the blog interesting.

Mick Carney said...

Great discovery Peter. Love her work. Thanks.

Peter Ward said...

OK Mick. More great artists to come in future posts.

Sandi - Australia said...

Hi Peter, Your blog is fabulous. I stumbled on it tonight when I was researching Judi Whitton. Have her book from the library and am drooling over it after a hard day's work - pure relaxation. Thankyou for your blog. I have left a comment tonight somewhere near the end of 2011 posts, then decided to track you to the present day. Shall certainly be returning to immerse myself in this watercolour paradise.

Peter Ward said...

Welcome Sandi and thanks for your kind comments. I know Judi well having done five painting workshops with her.

Yvonne Harry said...

Great, Peter. Thanks for highlighting her work, I will follow it up on the sites you suggest. See you soon!

Peter Ward said...

Thanks Yvonne. Terrific artist by any standards.

Rui said...

Hi Peter,

Many thanks for following up on the magazine article with further questions.

Interesting to see few quinacridone colours as part of the basic palette.

Kind regards,

Rui

Peter Ward said...

Hi Rui

You'll have noticed there are some contradictions between the two sets of information - portrait/landscape.

Rui said...

Hi Peter,

Yes, as you have commented on your article a few contraditions came up including the lack of use of cadmium colours in the landscape palette which is fine with me as I tend not to use any opaque colours.

By the way, have you noticed the similarities of Sennelier's discontinued line of watercolours (the one before the present Aquarelle one and Jackson's own line of watercolours?

Kind regards,

Rui

Peter Ward said...

My understanding Rui is that Jacksons own brand watercolours are made by Sennelier. Whether they'll be upgraded to the new range is a moot question?

ashok said...

wonderful to discover this..thanks

Peter Ward said...

Welcome Ashok Thanks for commenting.

Robert P. Armas said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Robert P. Armas said...

Wow,Peter,thank you for exposing this excellent artist.I didn't knew of her before.I really like her style,specially on the portraits!

Peter Ward said...

She is excellent, especially the portraits Robert. Who influenced her I don't know but there is a resemblance to CR's work, although her tecnique seems very different.

Robert P. Armas said...

Yes Peter,there seems to be a resemblance to CR works in her portraits,and also some of Ted Nuttnall,but in this late case,I don't know who started painting first(Ted or her).

Peter Ward said...

Yes Ted Nuttall seems quite similar but the CR influence is apparent in so many artists yet few acknowledge this. It's something that annoys Judy Reid