Wednesday, 7 April 2010

Quinacridone Gold - Pigment PO49

This colour, described by the Australian watercolour artist Robert Wade, in his 2002 book `Robert Wade's Watercolor Workshop Handbook', as the `best thing for years',  has had a rapid rise and - apparently - fall. Described by Handprint as a`mixed crystal form of PV19 Alpha and Beta' - I've no idea what that means - pigment production ceased in 2001 due to lack of demand from the automotive industry. This is again from Handprint who also say most paints with this pigment were discontinued in 2005. Initially there appeared to be four, two from Daniel Smith, the others from Winsor & Newton and Maimeri.

Winsor & Newton Quinacridone Gold became very popular in the UK. I can't speak for Daniel Smith which is still, as a brand,  only available in the USA ( recently extended to Canada).Note:20/10/12 Now available in the UK. It is possible (a little bird tells me) that  Daniel Smith, the largest range of watercolours in the World with over 200 paints, and highly acclaimed by American artists, may be available in the UK in the not too distant future.

Winsor and Newton reformulated `Quinacridone Gold' as a mixture now containing PR206, PV19 and PY150. All excellent pigments but don't expect the same results when mixing with others.

Maimeri continue to offer their version, called `Golden Lake', although the tube states it contains `quinacridone PV49.' I can find no trace of a `PV49' so assume it is a misprint that Maimeri have failed to correct - it has been like this since introduction. I contacted Bruce McEvoy about his comment that the paint was discontinued in 2005, which is what  Maimeri told him he says, and his reply was `the tube  may say that but....' .
An initial enquiry to Maimeri was promptly answered saying `Golden Lake' was still available and indeed they had supplied some to Jacksons, one of the largest UK art suppliers, in January. Following Bruce's comments I contacted Maimeri again and asked what was in the paint and why PV49? My e-mail was acknowledged but nothing further has been heard since. Hmmmmm!

Is that the end of it? On checking through lists of paints from several leading makers I came across this from Sennelier, the French manufacturer. According to their current pigment information PO49 is listed in five paints, all mixtures. Quinacridone Gold (with PG7), Mars Yellow (with PBr7), French Ochre (with PG23,PY3), Yellow Lake (with PY153), and Chinese Orange (with PR209)! No shortage of PO49 there it seems but no pure pigment paint either. I believe, until recently at least, Daniel Smith was still offering Quinacridone Gold in it's huge range. However since writing this I note that the new Great Art catalogue http://www.greatart.co.uk/ has a watercolour chart for Sennelier with one difference. Quinacridone Gold, as a name, has vanished and under the same number 445 is something called `Brown Pink'.Note: 20/10/12. Sennelier reformulated their range in 2012.

I only have experience with the W & N and Maimeri versions. Winsor & Newton Quinacridone Gold  was lighter and handled better than `Golden Lake', which I have not been impressed with. I like Maimeri paints, which are excellent value, but this colour is darker and grittier than the original Winsor & Newton paint. What actually is in the tube? The silence from Maimeri makes me wonder.Note:20/10/12. Information from Maimeri to Handprint said they had replaced PO49 with PY43 `a similar pigment'.

As a footnote the closely allied Quinacridone Orange PO48 is also heading for the exit due to `lack of demand from the automotive industry'. This is another lovely pigment and the Graham version, Quinacridone Rust, is a gorgeous colour.  The new Da Vinci (USA) range also includes paints listing this pigment. Both Graham and Da Vinci are only available from T.E Lawrence of Hove in the UK http://www.lawrence.co.uk/, while Maimeri from Jacksons  http://www.jacksonsart.co.uk/ and Turnham http://www.artistmaterial.co.uk/ , possibly a few others. Jacksons also sell Sennelier.

8 comments:

Gabu said...

Maimeri's paint is listed in Jackson's catalog as PO49, and so it is on their official site (see http://www.maimeri.it/Generale/colore.asp?id=39), so I believe they just misspelled the label.
Now, how much of _actual_ pigment is really in there is a whole different question, as it is for many paints ;)

Peter Ward said...

Maimeri list it as quinacridone PV49 on the tube so it is obviously mispelled. I have since discovered PV49 is actually Cobalt Violet so it cannot be that pigment. Maimeri's failure to reply to my query about the contents does make you think and goes some way to confirming Bruce McEvoy's scepticism.

Gabu said...

I agree, I just tested Maimeri's Gold Lake and it is far from the beautiful transparent duo-chrome marvel I remembered from W&N. Moreover the paint out of the tube is full of dark speckles that only partially dissolve after much stirring, and the vehicle is thick and gluey so brushstrokes tend to stripe if not in diluted washes... Wish someone with the proper equipment for an analysis would solve the mistery.
Maimeri should definitely clarify and fix or discontinue the paint.. As it is now, it doesn't seem much use in a catalog of paints of otherwise general high quality.
Gab

Anonymous said...

Even after pigments are no longer manufatured there still is usually 'stock' left with differenct manufacturers. Manganese Blue is an example of this, but one mostly finds it in oils these days. PO48 and PO49 are no longer manufactured, but can be found if you scratch around a bit. Danile Smith still has a bunch of it, but it was produced by a different chemical company and is a different hue. Happy painting.

Anonymous said...

...a different company then the beautiful Maimeri pigment that is. Not better or worse, just a differnt hue.

Anonymous said...

April 2012 and PO48 and PO49 are both still available in the UK, the former from both DS & M. Graham, the latter just from DS.

I don't have much experience with keeping tubes for years and years, but the hoarder in me wants to stockpile these paints to future-proof my palette! Any thoughts on this?

Joe

Peter Ward said...

Welcome Joe. A few years ago I visited the Dalerr Rowney factory and asked the head chemist how long were watercolour tubes viable? He said up to ten years.

If Handprint is correct - and they usually are - then PO48 and PO49 are no longer manufactured. Stock up.

Anonymous said...

Thanks for your input Peter, and sorry it took me a while to check for your reply. I now have quite a few tubes of these paints. I mostly use the D.S. quinacridone gold for final thin glazes... so hopefully it will last the decade.

Joe